"Salomé" lyrics by U2


"Salomé" lyrics by U2


Salome was inspired by the character from the Bible who asked for John the Baptist's head.

Lyrics

Baby please
Baby please don't go
I got eyes to feed, they want skin and seed
Now don't make me crawl
Baby please
Baby don't bite your lip
Give you half what I've got if you untie the knot
It's a promise

Salomé x 4

Yeah, yeah, yeah

Baby please
Baby, what's that tune
Well, I heard it before when I crawled from the door
And my blood turned blue
Baby please
Baby please slow down
Baby, I feel sick
Don't make me stick to a promise

Salomé
Salomé
Salomé
Salomé
Salomé
Salomé

I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you

Baby please
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Baby don't sing yet
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Won't you dance for me
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Beneath the cherry tree
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Won't you swing down low
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Please
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Baby please say yes
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Baby don't go away
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you
Don't spill any of your precious love
I got to get you
Got to, got to get you

Shake it, shake it, shake it Salome x 8
Salome

I got to get you
Got to, got to get you

10 U2 songs that reflect on American culture and politics

Bono wearing an American flag jacket
Outside is America

10 U2 songs that reflect on American culture and politics


U2 are no strangers to having a say on America, its people and its politics. They are fairly big on political activism,.

In fact, making political commentary is almost second nature to Bono, if he's not singing about troubles in Ireland, he's trying to convince someone like George Bush Jnr to reduce the debt owed to America by third world countries. He shares his views because he earnestly cares.

U2 toured America many times early in their career and appear to have fallen under its spell - so it's no surprise really that Bono has chosen to write about what he's seen and heard and learned.

Here's a selection of 10 U2 songs that feature some form of lyrical comment or celebration of the one of the world's most dynamic countries.

Angel of Harlem


A song about singer Billie Holiday, Bono was trying to throw the kitchen sink at this song, referencing all kinds of musical figures related to the city of New York - even a popular radio station was mentioned!

U2 appeared to be trying to 'get into' the blues on Rattle on Hum - this song was a clear step in that musical genre and the dropping in of names from artists that helped shape it were an attempt to give an air of authenticity.

America is after all, the home of the blues.

A less cynical reader might simply see the lyrics of Angel of Harlem as a celebration of the city.

The Saints Are Coming


While not written by U2 or Green Day (it was a cover of The Skids song), The Saints Are Coming is a song both bands recorded together to deliver a blunt political message about the U.S. Government's response to Hurricane Katrina which many felt was negligent and that the Bush administration was "Stuck on Stupid".

The promotional video deliberately played on popular feelings of utter disbelief and dismay at the way the U.S. government had responded to the event.

Stuck on stupid indeed.

Bullet the Blue Sky


Perhaps the archetype political song by U2 (arguably Sunday Bloody Sunday could take that role too) the lyrics describes the unintended consequences of US President Ronald Reagan's foreign policy decisions in South America.

The song lyrics are a overt criticisms of the American policy of "stop communism at all costs".

Such policy lead the Reagan Administration to provide financial and political support to the Salvadoran regime which required them to ignoring that regime's abuse of human rights. 


Is it really any surprise that U2 ended up writing a song about New York?

Bono has stated that the song is a tribute of sorts to both Frank Sinatra and Lou Reed.

The Play Boy Mansion


The Play Boy Mansion is possibly a symbol of all that is wrong and right with America - either way Hugh Hefner is as popular as ever.

The songs lyrics are perhaps a tongue-in-cheek run down of some American icons.

Certainly Bono would not be deliberately suggesting the route to happiness is a visit to Hefner's pad.

Or is he?

Elvis Ate America and Elvis Presley And America


Two for the money here - U2 have often sang about Elvis - and these songs were a celebration of the man and his legacy on music.

The lyrics that 'Elvis would have been a sissy without Johnny Cash' was a great piece of commentary - the use of the word 'nigger' was a brave move.... did Chuck D approve?

Zooropa


Many of the verse lyrics are borrowed from the slogans of American companies and corporations.

These slogans include "Be all that you can be" from the United States Army), "Fly the friendly skies" from airline United Airlines), Colgate's "Ring of confidence (the lyric being "We've got that ring of confidence"), and Fairy's "Mild green Fairy liquid" (the line being "We're mild and green and squeaky clean").

This could be simply viewed some kind of meta commentary on American consumerism (admittedly the song has slogans from other European countries) and perhaps hints at some kind of moral confusion where the morals of a society may be dictated by the corporate dollar spend on advertising.

Pride (In the Name of Love)


Pride has become an international anthem for peace, freedom and human rights.

It's inspiration was civil rights movement in the United States in the 1950s and '60s.

The song is a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. who has become the symbol for equal rights in America for all persons.

U2 also wrote the song MLK about the same subject.

Seconds


While the lyrics are a loose story of a terrorist trying to arm a bomb and perhaps set it off, the context for the song is that it was written by Bono in the 1980s.

This was a period where the Cold War between the USSR and America had reached an all time freezing point in relations (save for the Cuban missile crisis!).

The song evokes the fears that people had that this Cold War could potentially lead to nuclear war and the own kind of cold winter that would bring.

That's just a taste of songs that U2 have used to make a comment on America.

There's almost a duplicity to U2 in this regard - they tour America and revel in it's people and then at the same time they make sharp criticsm of its leaders, their institutions and Coke but take the ticket sales and sponsorship opportunities.

I trust U2 fans are in on it but it might be hard to tell in a country where many people think Bruce Springsteen's Born in the USA is a patriotic song.....

U2 songs that reference nuclear bombs and other horrors

u2 protesting nuclear power plant

U2 songs that reference nuclear bombs and other horrors

U2 are known for their political views and agitation to get policy change but where as a band like Rage Against the Machine would be all in your face – U2 are just as obvious but less angry – their last tour featured members of Amnesty International coming out on state during Walk On – a song dedicated to Aung San Suu Kyi,  a Burman political prisoner and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Both band’s lyrics also push the barrel of whatever agenda they have – a long standing on for U2 has been referencing atomic war and nuclear issues.

U2 also once famously protested against the Sellafeild nuclear plant by colluding with Greenpeace to stage an event on a beach near the site that was contaminated with radiation as the result of the power plant’s activities.

As far as I can figure the earliest U2 song lyrics that refers to atomic bombs is from the non album single, Celebration where Bono sarcastically shares that he believes in the following three things:

“I believe in the third world war
I believe in the atomic bomb
I believe in the powers that be but they won't overpower me”

That was as far back as 1982.

Seconds from the popular War album is another early U2 songs to make direct references to atomic bombs

“And they're doing the atomic bomb
Do they know where the dance comes from
Yes, they're doing the atomic bomb
They want you to sing along

Bono said to the NME music magazine in 1983 of the song "There is a line in 'Seconds' about a fanatic assembling a nuclear device in an apartment in Times Square, New York, but it could be anywhere. We are now entering the age of nuclear terrorism where a group of fanatics could have the capabilities of bringing a bomb into a city and holding millions of people to ransom."

The Unforgettable Fire was released in 1984 in a time when the world was worrying itself sick about the arms race between the US and the Russians. Bono was inspired by a collection of paintings collectively known as The Unforgettable Fire which was a reference to atomic bombs being dropped in the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Ngagasaki. 

Says the Edge of the art display (in the book U2: Into the Heart: The Stories Behind Every Song) "the image of that purging quality, coupled with the insight it gave into the horror of nuclear holocaust, stuck in Bono's mind".

It is perhaps ironic then the lyrics to song The Unforgettable Fire do not reference anything nuclear or atomic!

The Wanderer, featuring country and western legend Johnny Cash from the Zooropa album was definitely suggestive of being set in a post apocalyptic world set under an 'atomic sky'. Lyrically it featured a character that appeared to be struggling to find some kind of spiritual identity.

Another U2 album title also referred to atomic bombs in a most direct fashion – How to Dismantle An Atomic Bomb was a popular album that had a bonus track Fast Cars which gave the answer to the album’s question – one dismantles an atomic bomb with love.

Are there any other U2 lyrics that refer to nuclear issues?

Check out this other article that discusses Bono's lyric writing abilities

Dreaming With Tears In My Eyes Lyrics U2

Dreaming With Tears In My Eyes Lyrics U2

"Dreaming With Tears In My Eyes"

My heart is longing for you, love
I cared for you more then you knew
Though you have broken each promise
And yesterday's dreams are untrue

Alone, I'll be yearning tomorrow
When sunshine brings memories of you
My sunshine will turn into sorrow
As I dream of the love we once knew

Why should I always be lonesome
When sunny and blue are the skies
While shadows and loneliness linger
I'm dreaming with tears in my eyes

Why did you promise me sweetheart
Never to leave me alone
Yesterday's sunshine is faded
Your love wasn't true like my own

Alone, I'll be yearning tomorrow
When sunshine brings memories of you
My sunshine will turn into sorrow
As I dream of the love we once knew

Why should I always be lonesome
When sunny and blue are the skies
While shadows of loneliness linger
I'm dreaming with tears in my eyes


(This song, performed by Bono & Larry, can be found on the Songs of Jimmie Rodgers album)